Wednesday, April 20, 2005

Wired help to build community & geographical ties?

While Dutton et al caution that electronic networks could lessen geographical ties, Ellis et al rejoice in how communities (however we choose to define them) can be fostered to strengthen human relations. Can a wired city concept today - like Madison's or others proposed in throughout US - especially as promoted by city government - potentially bring in more people to participate as members of their physical communities? I have to think that if we could see just 10 years ahead on widespread Internet access provided in a cost-effective way and supported by the geographical-center of a city, that this would help enlighten people to things outside of the city yet root them further in their physical community because of the improvement of information. Much better than the public access channel of city mtgs - given the interactive component of the Internet. Is this idea just a modern-day step up from the widespread information spread by the US Postal Office? Could widespread city-supported access truly lower cost of entry to bring in more people, and enhance real community within geographical ties?

5 comments:

Linda said...

The big obstacle I see to Madison or any other city becoming more participatory through wireless connectivity is the digital divide. The postal service goes into Madison's ghetto areas, but I see few computers there, and most of the computers that are there are not connected to the internet and are not wireless. I worry that without the physical technology needed to participate, the digital divide will become even greater in well-meaning cities like Madison.

Linda said...

The big obstacle I see to Madison or any other city becoming more participatory through wireless connectivity is the digital divide. The postal service goes into Madison's ghetto areas, but I see few computers there, and most of the computers that are there are not connected to the internet and are not wireless. I worry that without the physical technology needed to participate, the digital divide will become even greater in well-meaning cities like Madison.

Linda said...

The big obstacle I see to Madison or any other city becoming more participatory through wireless connectivity is the digital divide. The postal service goes into Madison's ghetto areas, but I see few computers there, and most of the computers that are there are not connected to the internet and are not wireless. I worry that without the physical technology needed to participate, the digital divide will become even greater in well-meaning cities like Madison.

Linda said...

The big obstacle I see to Madison or any other city becoming more participatory through wireless connectivity is the digital divide. The postal service goes into Madison's ghetto areas, but I see few computers there, and most of the computers that are there are not connected to the internet and are not wireless. I worry that without the physical technology needed to participate, the digital divide will become even greater in well-meaning cities like Madison.

Linda said...

The big obstacle I see to Madison or any other city becoming more participatory through wireless connectivity is the digital divide. The postal service goes into Madison's ghetto areas, but I see few computers there, and most of the computers that are there are not connected to the internet and are not wireless. I worry that without the physical technology needed to participate, the digital divide will become even greater in well-meaning cities like Madison.